Wiesna Mond-Kozłowska Pomiń menu

Biography

I was born at the Baltic seaside, in Pomerania, on the west coast-line of the Polish Sea. This existential factor played an important role in my life at least in two aspects. The once great centre of Medieval spiritual and artistic life, Trzebiatów upon the Rega River, famous for its splendid Gothic cathedral – one of the most beautiful in the region – was the place to take the first deep breath in my life. The religious and cultural environment, together with the extremely beautiful cliff Baltic shore, influenced predominantly my personal growth and development towards the studies of art and philosophy. It was also enhanced by the fact that one of my friends was a Greek, some generous gentleman who introduced Ancient Greek culture to the Polish community with whom he lived as a political refugee.

The Baltic Sea, a western section of the Pomerania coastline, photo by W.M.-K. The Baltic Sea, a western section of the Pomerania coastline, photo by W.M.-K.

The example of the Gothic “verticalism” of the interior space: ribs that sustain the vaults in the Kamień Pomorski cathedral, 11th century, Poland, photo by W.M.-K. The example of the Gothic “verticalism” of the interior space: ribs that sustain the vaults in the Kamień Pomorski cathedral, 11th century, Poland, photo by W.M.-K.

The Medieval Gothic art, the natural landscape of the Baltic Sea and the Classical Greek inspirations concentrated around the Acropolis theme, every now and then mentioned by my Greek neighbour, proved with time to be the leading stimuli at the first stage of my education. Looking back I can see how significantly they shaped all the choices in my further education that was followed by research into the humanities and involvement into artistic performance. From the very outset of my mature life, the philosophy and culture of Ancient Greece have been revealing the beauty of art and its importance in man’s life. Firstly, through the powerful impact of performative arts – theatre and dance; secondly through fine arts and literature. In a quite obvious way, the Greek philosophy, from its Ionian origins to Pythagoras and Socrates, then Plato, Aristotle and Aristoxenus – all of them provided me with the fundamental conceptions and offered terms highlighting a deeper thought about human nature and the Universe. Once woken up at the Baltic Sea shore the initial intuition of the interactive dependence between nature and culture and intertwining of the aesthetic experience with the experience of the sacred have been enhanced almost every day by contacting with the Gothic art of Trzebiatów, Kamień Pomorski, Szczecin, Gdańsk and Toruń.

The academic centres of Poznań, Krakow, Urbino, Perugia, Rome, London, Vilnius, Athens and Warsaw have been consecutive stages to develop and master (always performed ad infinitum) the understanding of the function of art in the human life. They were to bring the nature of the aesthetic experience to the fore, to become eventually a core subject of my current research into aesthetics and theory of art.

A statue of the goddess, marble, Classical period, the Agora Museum, Athens, Greece, photo by W.M.-K. A statue of the goddess, marble, Classical period, the Agora Museum, Athens, Greece, photo by W.M.-K. Fluting, the ornamental grooves channeled vertically into the shaft of a column, here of the Doric order (as they meet at the sharp edge), marble, 5th century B.C., Acropolis, Athens, Greece, photo by W.M.-K. Fluting, the ornamental grooves channeled vertically into the shaft of a column, here of the Doric order (as they meet at the sharp edge), marble, 5th century B.C., Acropolis, Athens, Greece, photo by W.M.-K.

Needless to say, the cultural heritage of the Ancient Greek culture endowed me with the special interest for the dance as a direct manifestation of man’s self-knowledge, pointing out some evident sacred origins of the human art. As a result I started researching into the world dance culture, and through dance arrived at the comparative aesthetics. Firstly on the ground of the ontology of a piece of work, secondly in the domain of the culture studies. Through the field work in magnificent realms of man’s endemic and still living and lived art that can be found in Greece, Sardinia & Italy, England, Ireland, Georgia, Persia and India, which was consciously reinforced by simultaneous research into rich collections of art of London, Rome, Berlin, New York, Copenhagen, Stockholm, Tel-Aviv, Madrid, Prague, Budapest, Krakow and Warsaw, I have been learning the powerful working of the human art in the realm of education, cognition, spirituality and ethics.

Ars longa vita brevis reads on many façades of the Krakow palaces, and I do agree.

The head of the Greek youth, marble, 5th century B.C., The Archeological Museum of  Pireus, Greece, photo by W.M.-K. The head of the Greek youth, marble, 5th century B.C., The Archeological Museum of Pireus, Greece, photo by W.M.-K. The Acropolis marble with a meander motif, Classical period, Athens, Greece, photo by W.M.-K. The Acropolis marble with a meander motif, Classical period, Athens, Greece, photo by W.M.-K.